Torture Still Goes On

Jeffrey Kaye in The Public Record of Dec 8th, 2011 quotes Diane Feinstien:

“As chairman of the Select Committee on Intelligence, I can say that we are nearing the completion [of] a comprehensive review of the CIA’s former interrogation and detention program, and I can assure the Senate and the Nation that coercive and abusive treatment of detainees in U.S. custody was far more systematic and widespread than we thought.

“Moreover, the abuse stemmed not from the isolated acts of a few bad apples but from fact that the line was blurred between what is permissible and impermissible conduct, putting U.S. personnel in an untenable position with their superiors and the law.”

This testimony by Senator Diane Feinstein concludes with more obfuscating language, but this part is at least clear and direct.   Kaye continues:

“One reason for the lulled non-murmur over torture is the outrageous lie that Obama, after coming into office, ‘ended torture.’  He enshrined the Army Field Manual as the supposedly humane alternative to the Bush torture regime of ‘enhanced interrogation techniques.’ Feinstein, who certainly knows better, is an exemplary model for such myth-making — ‘myth’ because the Army Field Manual actually uses torture of various sorts, and even though about half-a-dozen human rights and legal organizations, and a number of prominent government interrogators have said so in a Nov. 2010 letter signed by 14 well-known interrogators to then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates..” Feinstein clearly knows this and,  as Kaye shows in the rest of the article, but she still claims that the AFM and other guidelines are enough without secret documents.  What she fails to say is that they allow torture openly.

He states that he does not expect Feinstein to respond to questions he has about US torture methods.  He continues:

“Instead I ask readers, what kind of a country is it that has torture written into its public documents, and no one raises a fuss (or practically no one)?

“The failure to take on the AFM [Army Field Manual]and its Appendix M abuses in a serious fashion has led in a straight line to the political pornography of watching torture debated in Congress and among Presidential candidates, as well as a surge of political effort being made in some circles to make sure all such abuse is hidden forever behind a veil of classification. This failure is directly the responsibility of the human rights groups, who have not made it clear to their constituencies and the public at large how serious the problem currently is. While most of them are on the record of opposing the abuses described above, they repeatedly have pulled their punches for political reasons (as during the recent debate on the Ayotte amendment), and as a result, they must take the hard criticism when it comes, until, or unless they turn this around.”

I ask why we as citizens depend on the “human rights groups” who don’t do what they can for “political reasons.”  Such groups are not worth supporting.  What can we do directly as citizens?  Are we among those who have let US torture go unchallenged?  What can we do to resist torture by the US government right now?

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