Close Guantanamo Protest, Jan. 11, 2012

We gathered at Lafayette Park across from the White House, protesters from all over who were determined on the date of the beginning of the 11th year of the infamous torture camp at Guantanamo Bay to see it closed.  Our group had gotten on the bus in New York at 6:30am to get there.

Speakers, including Col. Morris Davis, ret. who was a prosecutor at the prison and has denounced it, reminded us briefly of the horrors there and of the blight on the US of establishing and continuing this and other torture centers throughout the world.  It was cold and raining, but we were not daunted.  Many of us donned the orange jumpsuits that the prisoners wear.  We wanted to be as brightly visible to the people in Washington, DC as the prisoners are to their guards.

After a stop in front of the White House …

… we began a  long march of over two miles through the city to the Supreme Court Building.

Crossing the street to head up to the Supreme Court

We were noisy and spirited in spite of the weather.  “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Guantanamo has got to go!”  “What do we want?  Human rights!  When do we want them? Now?”  were chanted all along the way.

Some of our youngest protesters leading the chants

The World Can’t Wait contingent had two big banners that proclaimed to passers by and motorists just exactly what we demand.

We stopped at the Department of Justice to chant, “What do we want? Justice.  When do we want it? Now!”  and “Shame! Shame!”  Then we continued on.

Marching to the Supreme Court

When we finally got to the Supreme Court building, 171 protesters, representing the remaining prisoners at the Guantanamo torture camp, stood on the steps.

On the Steps of the Supreme Court

A few people who have been instrumental in the movement to close the camp and lawyers who have fought for the rights of the prisoners made brief remarks.

Debra Sweet told us we were there because we are “not adjusted to injustice,” earning a big cheer.

Debra Sweet, Director of The World Can’t Wait

I silently made a vow never to get adjusted to it.

Lots of people made photographs with digital cameras and cell phones in addition to some alternative media sources and filmmakers like Ed Haas whose film produced the stills on this post.

Andy Worthington, world authority on and advocate for the prisoners

One of the lawyers read a poem by her client, a prisoner whom the US has declared never to have been engaged in any violence much less against this country and who has endured torture and indefinite imprisonment for ten long years with no end in sight.  It was a tragic cry of desperation: will he ever see his children, his wife, his parents again?  It was my very great privilege to have been asked to dance as she read.

Some of the lawyers from the Center for Constitutional Rights who are at Guantanamo right now had called to let their colleagues know that the prisoners were aware we were protesting and had taken heart from that.  They were protesting, too, with a hunger strike on January 10, 11, and 12 and a sit down strike for those allowed to move about.  Not all of them are in that category.  I hated thinking about both the conditions of those others and the possible retribution for all of them.  I can only admire their continuing courage and humanity.

Union  Station where we were to get back on the bus was only a few blocks from the Supreme Court.  When the proceedings were over, we walked down to board the bus for the long ride home, cold, wet, and tired, but very glad to have been at this historic protest.  We have done what we could to

CLOSE GUANTANAMO NOW.

See Ed Haas’s film footage here.

Go to Closeguantanamo.org to join with others to close down this heinous torture camp.

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